June 2011 | Cigarettes for Sale Online | Premium Blog

Thursday, June 30, 2011

Long Branch beaches made smoke-free

The city's public beaches are now smoke-free after the council on Tuesday unanimously agreed to prohibit the use of cigarettes, tobacco and chewing tobacco along the oceanfront.

That means the only public beachfront in the city where smoking still is permitted is Seven Presidents Oceanfront Park, which is owned and operated by Monmouth County.

Violeta Peters, a city resident who serves on the Monmouth County Board of Recreation Commissioners, said as far as she knows, the issue of smoke-free beaches at Seven Presidents has not been discussed. She is just starting her second term on the board.

"But now that public beaches right next door have been declared smoke-free ... we would certainly be up for discussing it," said Peters.

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Tobacco chewing poses cancer threat

South Asian men are more likely than any other group in New Jersey to use chewing tobacco -- and health officials are concerned that many actually believe it is good for them.

In the first study of its kind, researchers at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey drilled down through reams of federal data about tobacco use to learn about the smoking and tobacco use of South Asian immigrants.

They found that 2.7 percent of South Asian men use smokeless tobacco, compared with 1 percent of white men and 0.3 percent of black men.

Indian men were more likely to chew tobacco than Pakistani or Bangladeshi men, and Pakistanis were more likely to smoke cigarettes than the other immigrant groups.

Women from South Asia were more likely to take up smoking, upon immigrating to the northeastern United States, while men were more likely to quit.

"What we know about South Asians is that tobacco use is very deeply rooted in their culture," said Cristine D. Delnevo, the lead author of the study published in the most recent issue of Journal of Oncology, a special edition about smoking and cancer. . . .



This study was the first to use "country of origin" information to analyze cigarette smoking and smokeless tobacco use.

City to ban smoking on all beaches : Council to vote on ordinance June 28

LONG BRANCH -- Beachgoers may no longer have to worry about secondhand smoke now that the City Council has taken the first steps to ban smoking on city beaches.

Under current regulations, specific smoking areas are designated at various beach locations. At the June 14 meeting, the council introduced an ordinance that would ban all smoking on beaches. The council will vote on the measure on June 28.

Thursday, June 16, 2011

City Looking For Stricter Beach Smoking Regulations : Council introduces ordinances that will not allow smoking on any part

The city's regulations for smoking on the beaches could become much tighter by the end of this month.

During Tuesday night's Long Branch Council meeting, the council introduced an ordinance that would not allow smoking on any part of the city's beaches.

Currently, smoking is not allowed on beaches, with the exception of a few "designated smoking areas," according to City Business Administrator Howard Woolley. However, he said it has become increasingly more difficult to regulate these areas.

Monday, June 13, 2011

Report: N.J. almost last in personal and economic freedoms

A professor who wrote a report by a libertarian think tank said Monday that New Jersey is one of the least free of the 50 states, but qualified his remarks by saying, "We're not talking about Zimbabwe here."

The report by the Mercatus Center at George Mason University described New Jersey as having the second-worst record for personal and economic freedoms, second only to New York.
. . .


The other co-author, Jason Sorens, assistant professor of political science, University of Buffalo (SUNY), said California, New Jersey and New York qualified as "nanny states" because of such regulations as a ban on trans fats in restaurants, public smoking and high tobacco taxes.

Friday, June 10, 2011

N.J. to help smokers kick habit with free nicotine replacement treatments

The state Department of Health and Senior Services is trying to help smokers kick the butts.

The department is now offering free nicotine replacement treatment -- such as patches and gum -- to help tobacco users quit the habit.

The goal is to get smokers to register with the NJ Quitline, by pledging to five or more counseling sessions.

"This is a way to drive smokers to a program we know works," said Mary O'Dowd, the commissioner of health.

The new program is mostly funded by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Some extra funding was provided by the state's Tobacco Age of Sale Enforcement program. About 600 quit-smoking kits have been distributed already, and supplies are limited, O'Dowd added.

Tuesday, June 7, 2011

Report: When evaluating personal, economic freedoms, NJ not a free state

A professor who wrote a report by a libertarian think tank said Monday that New Jersey is one of the least free of the 50 states, but qualified his remarks by saying, "We're not talking about Zimbabwe here."

The report by the Mercatus Center at George Mason University described New Jersey as having the second-worst record for personal and economic freedoms, second only to New York.

The report rated states based not only taxes and business regulation, but also by what the authors called intrusion into personal lives through licensing of professions, motorcycle and bicycle helmet laws, smoking bans and regulation of same-sex marriage. . . .


The other co-author, Jason Sorens, assistant professor of political science, University of Buffalo (SUNY), said California, New Jersey and New York qualified as "nanny states" because of such regulations as a ban on trans fats in restaurants, public smoking and high tobacco taxes.

RYS: Show of Lungs: Who Still Thinks Smoking's Cool?: The Philly kids passing around hookah pipes, apparently

I don't get the hookah bar craze. Then this week, I read a piece in the New York Times about something I didn't know and I'll bet most of the hipsters sucking on these things don't know, either: Hookahs can be even more hazardous than smoking cigarettes. . . .

Walk around Center City and there's no shortage of hookah bars, from Rittenhouse Square to South Street, and most of them are filled with 20-somethings. At a now-closed Middle Eastern restaurant across from Dirty Frank's, hookahs seemed to be the big draw for the kids who hung out there, many of whom barely looked old enough to buy a pack of Marlboros. I'm sure the crowd migrated somewhere else in town to get their tobacco fix. Hookah bars are in the suburbs, too; there used to be one in a strip mall in Voorhees, next to the old Ritz movie theater and an Office Depot. I wonder if Pennsylvania and New Jersey will follow the lead of other states, like California and Connecticut, and support legislation to limit hookah bars or at least in Philadelphia, bring an end to any exemptions in the indoor smoking ban that create loopholes for hookah bars. And I wonder if college kids would still think these funky pipes were so cool if they knew they could potentially be so addictive or so dangerous.